Thursday, September 30, 2010

Discussion: Creativity

My three-year-old son is obsessed with trains. To him, everything is a train--markers, playground equipment, even me. It's almost the opposite of that old brainstorming exercise where you think of as many different uses for an object as you can. So I came up with a question: is it more creative to make the same thing out of several different objects (what my son does) or to come up with several different things to do with the same object? In what types of situations would you find each type of creativity useful?

9 comments:

Misha said...

I think you can't really compare the two types of creativity, since they're actually two different tools that our mind use to do two different types of things.

I use the same type of creativity as your son when I have to use academic resources to write an essay. I'm forming many large and different things into what I want them to be.

I use the other creativity when I write stories. To create something out of nothing at all.

Both require a lot of skill though...

The Golden Eagle said...

I think that both are very important, since they each work for different situations.

Quinn said...

I think any type of creativity can be useful, but the type when you come up with multiple uses for the same object perhaps moreso.

Your son's type of creativity ... that's more just fun, play around, be silly creativity. I use it when I'm just trying to have fun.

Carolyn V. said...

My kids love to be creative with boxes. We have them all over the house! I'm trying to be creative with my description in my wip. It's harder for me, but I hope, with time, I can perfect it. =)

Sandra Ulbrich Almazan said...

Misha, I like your example.

Golden Eagle, I agree they're useful in different situations.

Quinn, multiple uses for the same object is probably more useful. But if all your character has is a hammer, then she needs to be able to find nails. ;) I hope this makes sense.

Carolyn, last week I did a writing exercise where I described a place I knew well. Maybe you would find descriptive writing exercises helpful too.

Sharon K. Mayhew said...

When I was teaching I had my students write a book using elison dye cut outs (sp?) they had to use the same shape on every page but change it in some way to turn it into something else...ex: I once was a star, but now I'm a bow. The star might be in the sky and the the bow might be on a present or in a girl's hair...

They made wonderful books. My only rule was they could not cut or tear the original shape...they could fold it, twist it, turn it, or add stuff around it... Fun activity.

Sandra Ulbrich Almazan said...

Sharon, that reminds me of a book my son has about counting fish. I can't remember the name, but it also has cutout on each page that become different parts of fish when you turn to the next page.

Stephen Tremp said...

I do like to find new uses for something, especially unintended uses. That's how some of the greatest breakthroughs in mankind have been discovered.


Stephen Tremp

Kelly said...

Both are very creative. It's so fun to watch your children's creativity blossom!
My son is obsessed with Star Wars. I volunteered in his kindergarten classroom today and he was acting out a scene from the movie!

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